Ethical Scavenger

WARNING - This blog is about bone cleaning and will include pictures of the entire process in its various stages.


This blog is meant to help educate and instruct those who wish to learn how to clean Ethically Scavenged bones.


I focus on honoring and appreciating nature and it's gifts - as well as respecting animal rights and helping to protect and preserve wildlife and habitat.


You may also find : interesting fossils, skeletal abnormalities, bone collecting through the ages, prehistoric bone tools and art plus information about the Skeletal systems of commonly found animals.

bonedork:

may0rpamelawinchell:

Hey guys! A friend of mine sent me a photo of this - hoping I would know what it was. Unfortunately, I don’t. Anyone have any ideas? It’s from Western Mass if that helps

Looks like a raccoon to me!

have to agree, the fur and head-shape seem very raccoon like

thedeadanddeceased:

I have a white rabbit pelt, and I do not want it any longer.
Is anyone up for a trade? I am willing to take scavenged bones, old or natural odds and ends, etc.

Please let me know if you are interested, and would like photos, or more info!

roadbones:

Alright, I’ll do my best to explain this. In all of these images the skull is to the right and the tail is to the left, and the left image is the top view and the right image is the bottom view.


•First two images are the cervical vertebrae. There should be 7 of these, including the atlas and axis, which are the very first two vertebrae and allow for side to side and up and down head movement.


•The next set are the thoracic vertebrae, and there should be 14. These are the vertebrae that connect to the ribs.


•Next set are the lumbar vertebrae, these are heavier set and there should be 6.

•Next two are the sacral vertebrae, which are fused into one, and connects to the pelvis. In these pictures you can also see the beginnings of the caudal vertebrae, or the tail. I didn’t get close ups of the whole tail because its pretty straight forward, just line them up largest to smallest.
Well okay, I hope that is helpful! If you or anyone else ever needs any reference images I’d be happy to oblige. Happy articulating!

EDIT: the vertebrae count was meant for a user asking about *raccoons*, these numbers vary between species, and caudal vertebrae can vary within a species as well.

hekatiia:

stayuglystayangry:

for-an-anarchist-hyrule:

anirishginger:

can’t say i approve of those dreads, but i’m envious of that grim bag

white peopledreads:facepalm
Manx Sheep skull, high five!

seconded all-around

a) I don’t give two fucks what you think of my hairstyle; also you don’t know what you’re talking about;
b) It’s not a Manx sheep it’s a Jacob sheep get your fucking old world Ovidae straight you puerile little shits.

ha! love this photo, love everything about this.

hekatiia:

stayuglystayangry:

for-an-anarchist-hyrule:

anirishginger:

can’t say i approve of those dreads, but i’m envious of that grim bag

white peopledreads:facepalm

Manx Sheep skull, high five!

seconded all-around

a) I don’t give two fucks what you think of my hairstyle; also you don’t know what you’re talking about;

b) It’s not a Manx sheep it’s a Jacob sheep get your fucking old world Ovidae straight you puerile little shits.

ha! love this photo, love everything about this.

(via beelzebuttz)

Asker Anonymous Asks:
any tips on keeping dermestid colonies alive and well?
bonecleaning bonecleaning Said:

shadyufo:

Dermestids are pretty easy keepers! Just keep them in a container they can’t climb out of, make sure it has ventilation, substrate (I like that crittercare stuff that walmart sells), some hunks of styrofoam for them to lay their eggs in, water, and most importantly, food! They love dried out, jerkified skulls and carcasses or fresh meat. Just make sure you only put in fresh in small amounts unless you have a huge colony that will knock it out in a day or two to keep it from making a smelly mess. And if you run out of carcasses they like leftover meat scraps, hot dogs, dog food, and so on.

BARBED ANTLER ARROW POINTS
ETOWAH, CAHOKIA & A KENTUCKY SITE
GEORGIA, ILLINOIS AND KENTUCKY

These socketed barbed antler arrow points were found on Mississippian period sites in Georgia, Illinois and Kentucky. They were made from the tips of an antler tines. The point at upper left was found on the Kunnemann tract on the Cahokia Mounds site. The point at upper right (a cast) was found during the excavation of Mound C with burial #1 on the Etowah Mound site. The point at lower right was found during the excavation of Mound 72 on the Cahokia Mounds site. The other three examples were discovered on a site in Kentucky. The longest point measures 1 15/16 inches (5 cm) long.

An amazing page with great photos to help you ID what kind of animals live near you. Excellent photos of tracks with size reference, information about the animal and other things to look for (like poo) to help you ID animal tracks.

Neat resource for bone collecting, know what’s around - what to watch out for - and who’s eating what.

puta-del-infierno:

i’ve had multiple people ask how i go about cleaning the bones i find, and all i really did was google a bunch of shit, lol. but this is my favorite website and the best lil key thingy i’ve come across!!! happy huntin

earthsoldiers:

earthlynation:

common sense, really

(via thegreenwolf)

mydeadthingsdiary:

Skin and skeletal mount of a european rabbit in the Horniman museum, photo taken by Cmglee