Ethical Scavenger

The Ethical Scavenger : Focusing on the ethical collection of bones and proper cleaning techniques.

eagerbones:

This is what hot weather does! Evaporates the water, puts bacteria in over-drive, grows algae. So amazing.

feralfoxbones:

Maceration does crazy things.

Asker Anonymous Asks:
Hi! This might be a dumb question, I'm kinda new to this. anyway, I found some deer bones out in the woods and was wondering what I'll need to do to clean them. There is no tissue on them as far as I can see, and they were scattered around the area so it seems like they've been out there for a while. I do plan on sanitizing them with hydrogen peroxide, but should I degrease them first? Thanks!
bonecleaning bonecleaning Said:

not a dumb question!

i’d suggest to give them a good wash in warm water and mild, natural dish soap and let them dry. If you see white powdery areas or very dark areas they might need to be degreased.

for degreasing i generally just give them a soak in very soapy (mrs. Meyers is my favorite) water for about two days and then scrub them down and let them dry again.

hope that helps

bonemonger:

The beetles have arrived - sittaeuropaea and I’s lovely little Dermestid colony - bring on the dead things!

(Click the photos for captions)

"Last year’s road-killed deer in Wisconsin totaled 44,210 (compared with an amazing 68,200 in deer-heavy Michigan). Because Wisconsin budgets $467,000 just to haul away dead deer, its DNR has changed several rules to make it easier for people to claim and use them. For example, Wisconsin last year finally began allowing drivers, or anyone who wanted, a freshly killed highway deer to remove the carcass, provided police were notified as soon as possible."

(via Salvaged Salvation - the Inland Northwest)

"Sometimes the roadkill comes to the Union Gospel Mission fully intact, other times the animal is cut and quartered. The meat hangs and cures for three to four days inside one of two walk-in coolers before the kitchen staff butchers it.

“We use the meat to feed the poor,” says Russell MacKenzie, director of food services. “We make about 950 meals a day at all of our properties.””